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Daylight-saving time in the United States ends at 2 a.m. on Sunday, Nov. 6, 2016.

Daylight-saving time in the United States ends at 2 a.m. on Sunday, Nov. 6, 2016.

Daylight-saving time in the United States ends at 2 a.m. on Sunday, Nov. 6, 2016,  so remember to set your clocks back one hour.

The history of daylight saving and time zones is an interesting one that deserves further investigation. While daylight-saving time is more balanced in the U.S. today, some states including Arizona and Hawaii do not participate at all. Some Amish communities across the country opt out of the practice as well.

Contrary to popular belief, agriculturists were not in favor of daylight-saving time when it was first implemented as a wartime measure in 1918. According to a history.com article, “[t]he sun, not the clock, dictated farmers’ schedules, so daylight saving was very disruptive.” In fact, some agrarian interest groups successfully advocated to end daylight-saving time a year after it was initially instituted.

Before it was regulated in 1966 by the Uniform Time Act, daylight-saving time was basically a free-for-all. Some states implemented it, while others didn’t, and each state could begin and end it whenever they chose. The history.com article states that “[p]assengers on a 35-mile bus ride from Steubenville, Ohio, to Moundsville, West Virginia, passed through seven time changes.”

Daylight time started as a way to enjoy the daylight more during the summer months and also to conserve energy, but, according to a New York Times article, it may no longer be serving that purpose. Instead of conserving energy, “the time change increased residential electricity consumption by 1 percent overall, with monthly increases as high as 4 percent in the late summer and early fall.” Because the days are longer until daylight-saving time ends in November, the cost of energy rises as people use their air conditioning later in the day to keep cool.

Whatever time it is, students can use ProctorU to take online exams, as ProctorU is open 24 hours a day and seven days a week. For more information, please visit www.proctoru.com.   

 

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